November 16, 2013

UCL Museums UCL Qatar

UCL Qatar

UCL Qatar

UCL Museums have played a key role in the establishment, in 2010,of UCL Qatar, a campus dedicated to research, post graduate teaching and professional development in museum studies, conservation and archaeology. UCL Museum staff have contributed to strategy, governance and regional staff support and help organise UK student placements. In its first year, 16 Masters students graduated in Museum and Gallery Practice, and 420 regional museum staff attended 40 professional short courses. As the first UK university in Qatar, this campus is set to play a significant role in the development of rapidly expanding museum services in the Gulf and wider Arab world.

November 16, 2013

Durham University Buddha’s birthplace

At Durham University, the Curator of University Museums is working with colleagues from the Department of Archaeology on a project designed to enhance the conservation and interpretation of the Buddha’s birthplace at Lumbini, Nepal. In 2013 he travelled to Lumbini and met representatives from the National Museum in Kathmandu and local museums at Lumbini and Tiluarakot and presented a paper on future options to a meeting organised by UNESCO and attended by representatives of UNESCO; the Lumbini Development Trust; the Nepali Government’s Department of Archaeology; the University of Tokyo and other key national and international partners in the Lumbini Development project.

November 16, 2013

Visiting with the Ancestors

Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford

Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford

Visiting with the Ancestors: The Blackfoot Shirts Project led by curatorial and conservation staff at the Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford and in collaboration with the University of Aberdeen, involved the development of mutually beneficial collaborations with Blackfoot First Nations in Canada. Historic hide shirts from the Museum’s collections were loaned to museums within traditional Blackfoot territory, where elders, ceremonialists, teachers and youth were able to handle them under supervision, prompting participants to share traditional knowledge, arts, rituals and social practice with each other. This project contributed to the survival of endangered arts and cultural heritage, strengthened social relationships and Blackfoot identity and contributed to social healing after colonial trauma.

Active outreach and an open door to connect with communities through collections

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