November 16, 2013

UCL’s Grant Museum Share Academy programme

UCL Grant Museum

UCL Grant Museum

UCL’s Grant Museum acts as a test-bed for new technologies for visitor interaction. Academics from several UCL departments developed QRator, a ground-breaking interactive iPad label system. The success of the museum pilot led to QRator’s being cited internationally and to a subsequent funded collaboration with the Imperial War Museum. UCL is now partnering with University of the Arts London in the Share Academy programme, which aims to broker academic partnerships with London’s specialist museums and bring QRator and similar innovations – notably an experimental UCL Museums developed measure of wellbeing – to the wider cultural sector.

November 16, 2013

Oxford ASPIRE Events Programme

The Oxford ASPIRE Events Programme, a series of knowledge-sharing workshops for museum and cultural professionals, is led by the ASPIRE team at Oxford University Museums as part of their Arts Council England-funded Major Partner Museum activity. Workshop themes include Fundraising and Philanthropy, Commercial Enterprise, Digital and Managing Museums. These have attracted delegates from across the country, are free to attend, and resources are freely available via the ASPIRE website and blog. Key to the success of these events is a focus not only on the experienced speakers invited to present and the facilitation of knowledge sharing and continued peer support between delegates.

November 16, 2013

Museum of Design in Plastics

Museum of Design in Plastics, Arts University Bournemouth

Museum of Design in Plastics, Arts University Bournemouth

The Museum of Design in Plastics (MoDiP) at the Arts University Bournemouth manages the Plastics Subject Specialist Network (SSN), which has 114 members representing 75 organisations, mainly other museums. Since the 1970s, plastics have become the most used material group in manufacturing and are thus an increasingly important material for our heritage. Working with Plastics SSN members, MoDiP has developed online and physical resources to help curators of collections with little knowledge of plastics identify and look after objects in collections. It has developed an online resource ‘Identifying Plastics Toolkit’ to foster best practice in the care, and thus preservation, of plastics objects in museums.

The identifying plastics toolkit consists of two parts:

o             An online identification route map, which you can use with objects from your own collection. It will help you find your way through the myriad of decisions to be made when identifying the specific plastics material from which an object may be made.

o             A travelling toolkit which is a physical resource that you can borrow free of charge. It aims to familiarise you with the characteristics of the plastics most frequently encountered within museum collections and provide a methodology to help in their identification.

Students learn using museum objects on more than 700 university courses in subjects as diverse as law, medicine, interior design, and languages

archive